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Best Toddler Travel Bed Guide
Portable beds, as the name suggests, are those beds that are lightweight and easily mobile. Portable beds are used in places where one cannot use large permanent beds. Portability and compactness is the main advantage of using these beds. Portable beds are usually made of a foldable metal frame, plastic, or lightweight wood, which is covered with linen, canvas, or nylon. The market for portable beds has been increasing considerably over the past few years, owing to the small living space. Also, they are the best alternative for traditional beds because of their multi-functionality and space-saving capability. 
Rapid urbanization has led to an increase in residential construction and has thereby increased the demand for these beds among the residents. While the non-residential segment also contributes toward the growth of portable beds, globally. Under the non-residential application, these beds are installed in hospitals, hotels, restaurants, hostels, and healthcare centers. Portable beds are considered as the best choice when it comes to living in a small place or studio apartment. Therefore, the market is projected to experience significant growth in the coming years.
Top Impacting Factors: Market Scenario Analysis, Trends, Drivers and Impact Analysis
The global market growth of portable beds is mainly driven by the adoption of beds in populated cities all over the world. Big and crowded cities like New York, Delhi, Beijing, Tokyo, and others have many people owning small homes or baby playard. Furthermore, the rise in number of nuclear families, rapid urbanization, fast-growing real estate industry, and multi-functionality also regulate the market growth for the portable beds. 
However, fluctuating prices of the raw material required for the production of portable beds hamper the market growth for this product. High cost leads to high prices, therefore, hindering the global market growth.  
The growing trend toward living in rented apartments, surge in population owing to smaller living areas, penetration of online retail, and shift of customers toward affordable, multifunctional, and smaller furniture propel the market growth. 

Furthermore, the manufacturers of portable beds are making efforts to bring innovation in the portable beds, as per the need of the modern customer. For instance, manufacturers have made bookshelves that can be easily transformed into a bed, coffee table, and even into a dining table. Various aesthetically appealing features continue to fuel the market growth.

When you’re traveling as a couple any hotel room will do, as long as there’s a double bed. Obviously, when you travel with kids the sleeping arrangements require a bit more planning, such as a nursery cot, or bassinet. Once your kids are old enough to sleep in a regular bed, you only need to make sure you can get an extra bed in the room. But while they’re still young, bringing a travel toddler bed is usually a cheaper and better option. Choosing the best portable toddler bed for your child isn’t an easy task, there are many different types available. This detailed buying guide will make your choice for the best toddler travel bed a lot easier.

Most often you don’t have to pay for kids up until a certain age when using the existing beds. In other words, young kids often get to stay for free in their parents room. Bringing your own kids travel bed gives you the option to book a regular double room and still have a secure place for your kids to sleep. This opens up a much wider (and cheaper!) range of accommodations to choose from.

What is a toddler travel bed? 
A toddler travel cot is a toddler portable bed, made especially for travel purposes. It is lightweight and easy to transport. We’ll discuss the many different kids travel bed options and our choice for the best travel beds for toddlers later in this article. There are several types of toddler travel beds. You can choose between a fold up toddler bed, a toddler air mattress or a pop-up toddler bed. Travel with kids really is much easier with the right gear! The pros and cons of each type of travel beds for kids are discussed in the ‘Choosing a toddler travel bed’ section below.
While kids are flexible and generally easy to travel with, they like routine and predictability. It really helped our son to have his own portable child bed. A small space in an unfamiliar environment that was his and always the same. A kids portable bed is made specifically for travel. Kids travel beds are compact, lightweight and easy to carry. And a portable bed for toddler use creates a secure sleeping area for your little one.

Do you need a toddler travel bed?
There are only three situations I can think of when you might not need a portable travel bed for your kid(s):
  1. you’re used to co-sleeping at home and will also do so while away

  2. you don’t mind spending lots of money on expensive family rooms (in which case you might still want to take portable bed rails for travel)

  3. you’ve pre-booked all your hotel rooms and are 100% positive they all provide a suitable sleeping solution for your kids such as a portable cot bed or a kids camping bed.
In all other cases, I would definitely check out the best portable bed options for toddlers. The only con of traveling with a foldable toddler bed or a toddler blow up bed is that you have to carry an extra piece of luggage. Other than that there are a lot of pros:
  • Very often a toddler travel bed, especially inflatable toddler travel beds, are a lot less heavy than portable travel cribs

  • Your kids have a safe and familiar place to sleep

  • You can choose from a wider range of accommodations and don’t have to restrict yourself to the ones that offer family rooms

  • You save money, because you don’t have to book expensive triple rooms or family rooms (which leaves you with more budget for fun stuff!)

  • You have a spare fold out toddler bed to use at home
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Posted30 / 07 / 2021
Creating a safe sleep bedding environment for your baby
Good sleeping habits are important for your baby's physical and emotional well-being. An important part of establishing good sleeping habits is the sleep environment – where your child sleeps, the kind of crib or baby bed, the type of mattress, and so on.
Creating a safe sleep environment will also reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is when a baby younger than one year of age dies unexpectedly while sleeping. Putting your baby to sleep on his back reduces the risk of SIDS.
The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends that babies under one year of age sleep on their backs in cribs that meet Canadian Government safety standards. Babies should not sleep in their parents’ bed, which is called bedsharing. Adult beds are not safe for babies. Many large-scale studies have shown that bedsharing can put babies at greater risk for entrapment and suffocation.
If you want your baby to be near you during the night, you can put a crib in your room, next to your bed. This is called cosleeping. Many mothers find that this makes night-time breastfeeding easier. This type of sleeping arrangement may also further reduce the risk of SIDS.
Whatever you choose, here are some things you should know to help you and your baby get a good and safe night's sleep.
General guidelines
  • For the first year of your baby’s life, the safest place to sleep is in the child’s own baby crib, on her back.

  • When your baby can turn over on his own, there’s no need to force your baby into the back sleep position. Foam wedges or towel rolls to keep babies on their side should not be used.

  • Infants should never sleep on pillows, air mattresses, waterbeds, cushions, soft materials or loose bedding. Even when you are travelling, your baby must have a safe place to sleep. Car seats and infant carriers are not to be used to replace the crib for your baby’s sleep.

  • A baby should sleep in a room that is quiet, dark and at a slightly cool temperature.

  • Consider dressing your baby in sleepers so that you don’t need a blanket to cover her.

  • Keep your baby away from cigarette smoke. Babies whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, and babies who continue to be exposed to smoke after birth are at an increased risk of SIDS.

  • Never nap or sleep with your baby or let your baby sleep alone on a couch, sofa or armchair. This increases the risk of suffocation.
Babies under one year of age should sleep on their backs in their own cribs
  • Be sure your baby cot meets government safety standards. 

  • Place your baby to sleep on his back on a firm, flat surface. Do not use eiderdowns (a comforter filled with a type of down), comforters, bulky blankets, bumper pads or pillow-like items in your baby’s bed.

  • Do not leave a bottle of milk or juice in your baby’s bed.

  • Establish a calming bedtime routine that is consistent and predictable.

  • Try to keep nap times and bedtime the same every day, even on weekends.

  • Set aside 10 min to 30 min to do something special with your baby before bed. Depending on your baby’s age, this could be a quiet talk, quiet play or reading.

  • Allow infants to fall asleep on their own so that they can learn to comfort themselves.
The practical benefits of bed sharing are obvious. Not only are parents close by to respond to the baby if something goes wrong, but co-sleeping makes it easier for the breastfeeding mom to nurse throughout the night. Then, of course, there's the irresistible sweet intimacy of it. "There is an instinctive need for the mother to be close to her baby," says Cynthia Epps, M.S., a certified lactation educator at the Pump Station in Santa Monica, Calif. Working women who don't get to see their babies all day may be especially attracted to co-sleeping to make up for the missed contact. "Keeping the baby close, with skin-to-skin contact, calms the baby," says Epps. "And it can cement the emotional bond between mother and child."

[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.95)]What about sharing a bed with older children, for whom co-sleeping poses no significant health risks? Samantha Gadsden, a birth doula in Caerphilly, Wales, shares a bed with her three children, even though the U.K.'s National Health Service shares the AAP's stance against co-sleeping. When other risk factors are not present, official discouraging of co-sleeping is "coercion and scare-mongering, and treating women like they are not intelligent," Gadsden told BBC News in November 2018. "It's biologically normal to co-sleep," she said, adding that parents should be informed of the pros, as wells as the cons, of bed-sharing, including the potential benefit of helping babies to regulate their breathing and temperature.


How Much Sleep Do Babies Need?
Sleep patterns will change over the first year of a baby’s life, including the number of hours of sleep needed and the duration of sleep periods throughout the day and night.
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  • 0 to 3 months: It’s normal for newborns to spend 14 to 17 hours1 asleep in a 24-hour day, broken into shorter periods to accommodate feeding, diaper changes, and interaction with their family. Breastfed infants usually need to eat more frequently than bottle-fed infants2, about every 2 hours versus every 3 hours. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine3 advises parents not to worry if their newborn’s sleep pattern doesn’t match the projections, as these amounts can vary before the first 4 months.

  • 3 to 6 months: Starting at around 3 months of age, an infant’s daily sleep needs drop to 12 to 15 hours. Around this time, sleep also starts consolidating into longer periods4 as babies are able to go longer without feeding. Sometime during this period is when most babies start to sleep through the night, though there are exceptions to the rule.

  • 6 to 12 months: From 6 months onward, babies do the bulk of their sleeping at night. However, other issues such as teething, growth spurts, illnesses, or sleep regressions may start leading to nighttime awakenings. Parents may opt to use more specific sleep-training strategies if babies aren’t sleeping through the night at this stage.
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Posted30 / 07 / 2021
The best ride-on toys
Which ride-on toy is best?
Learning to control a ride-on toy can be an exhilarating adventure for a child. However, the benefits go far beyond mere fun.
When using a ride-on toy, a child learns the fundamentals of balance and coordination while developing gross motor skills.
Each year, we scour the market in search of the best products for your particular needs to make shopping easier. If you would like to learn what makes a great ride-on toy and see our top-three choices for 2020, keep reading.
What you need to know before buying a ride-on toy
When shopping for a ride-on toy for your child, the first thing to consider is if it is age-appropriate. A ride-on toy that is for older kids may be dangerous for a younger child and lead to injuries. If, on the other hand, your child is too old for a ride-on toy, that means he or she will not be able to easily operate it and it might not support their weight. Again, this could lead to injuries. It is important to always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for age and weight restrictions.
When it comes to fuel, electric ride-on toy can be powered in a number of ways. Some models may need a parent to push the toy, while others require the child to perform some action, such as walking, peddling, or even wiggling from side to side, to propel the toy forward. There is also the option to purchase a ride-on toy that runs on battery power, so it can be driven like any other motorized vehicle. This last option is usually best for older kids.
It is important to realize that some ride-on toys are just vehicles while others have a plethora of features such as lights, sounds, storage space, and more. The number of extras you need will vary from child to child as some will be fascinated by beeps and honks while others will just want to ride.
While we’ve already mentioned size as it applies to the child’s age, parents also need to consider size as it pertains to storage. Some smaller models can easily be stashed away in a closet, but larger models may take up a considerable amount of room in the garage. Be sure you have adequate storage space for the ride-on toy that you are considering.
The last feature you will want to think about is the cost. While it is possible to find a durable child’s ride-on toy for $50, these models will be for the youngest kids, something that may be better suited for a playroom than the playground. As kids get older, their toys become more expensive. It is possible to spend $300 or more on a motorized vehicle that is suitable for an older child.

Benefits of Ride-On Toys for Kids
Parents have the privilege of helping their children develop physically, mentally, and emotionally. One of the ways they do so is through their choice of toys. For example, ride-on toys give parents an opportunity to help their children develop balance and coordination, motor skills, and a love of exercise.
We invite you to take a look at our selection of ride-on toys for children ages 1 to 6 years. And while you are browsing, keep in mind the following benefits of ride-on toys for kids:
 
1. Teaching Balance and Coordination
We all know just how difficult it is for small children to learn to walk. It takes an awful lot of balance and coordination just to sit up straight, let alone learn to stand and put one foot in front of the other. Encouraging your child to play with a ride-on toy helps a great deal here.
Our Giraffe Balance Bike offers a great example. With your help, your child can sit on this toy quite easily. Place the child in the seat, put his or her hands on the handlebars, and then gently hold him/her until you’re comfortable with letting go. Practice will help your child learn to balance on the seat even as he or she holds him/herself up with the handlebars.
 
2. Enhancing Motor Skills
In addition to balance and coordination, parents work with their children to enhance their motor skills. This is yet another one of the benefits of ride-on toys for kids. In addition to the Giraffe Balance Bike, consider a tricycles or a scooter. Both of these toys are designed to help children learn to use their legs to propel themselves forward.
Learning to steer the toys enhances motor skills in the arms as well. And of course, coordinating legs, arms, and eyesight pulls it all together.
 
3. Encouraging Exercise
A third benefit of ride-on toys for kids is encouraging them to exercise. They won’t know that’s what you’re doing but keeping them active with their ride-on toys is a natural and organic way to keep them exercising. And if you can encourage a love for this kind of play when they are young, it will hopefully carry through as they grow.
Ride-on toys are more than just objects for keeping kids entertained. They are toys that teach balance and coordination, enhance motor skills, and encourage exercise. What more could you ask from a child’s toy?
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Posted30 / 07 / 2021
A Runner's Guide to Jogging Strollers
What makes a jogging stroller a jogging stroller? The standard, 4-wheeled baby jogger has certainly been used for jogging in past years. Those runs had to be carefully planned to cover only flat, smooth surfaces, and great care had to be taken in securing and padding the child while you ran, because the stroller had a tendency to skitter every which way on the path due to its shopping cart wheels.
Over the past decade, a new breed of baby buggy has evolved with three large fixed wheels, shocks, 5-point safety harnesses and drink holders for the child. Since our last stroller review in 2002, the jogging stroller has continued to develop, and the models available today offer unprecedented ease of use and safety, both for the runner and the rider.
Of course, one person's improvement is another person's scourge. And anyone who has ever tried to find the "regular" kind of toothpaste on the grocery shelves knows that having lots of options just makes decisions that much more complicated. In this guide, we break down choosing a stroller into the major variables that can make a stroller just what you're looking for or the next-best-thing-that-falls-just-short. Then we'll take a look at a selection of strollers that is available today and give you some tips for getting started running with your new stroller.

THE BREAKDOWN
Stability: Stability, of course, is a good attribute for a baby travel system that will carry your precious bundle for many miles. But a well balanced stroller is not a runner's friend. Turning a stroller when running depends on uneven distribution of weight among the three wheels so that the runner can easily and smoothly lift the front wheel incrementally to turn the stroller around a corner or bend in the road. We observed that many of the strollers that are made for walking as well as running were much more stable, making them more difficult to maneuver when running. Take into consideration how much of your stroller time will be spent running versus walking.
Front Wheel: Many jogging strollers available today offer a front wheel that can be either locked into the straight-ahead position that is best for running, or set free to swivel, which makes steering when walking much nicer. This decision is related to the stability issue above. If you will be using your stroller only for running, then you don't need to spend the extra dollars to get one with a swivel option on the front wheel. Running with the wheel in swivel mode is dangerous because running over even a small pebble with a swivel wheel at running speeds could send the stroller quickly veering in an unplanned direction.
But who uses the stroller only for running? If you live in a city or other area where space is limited, you'll find the swivel wheel of great assistance in maneuvering the stroller around stores, sidewalks and anywhere else you might take your child. However, if you live in an area where there is plenty of room in stores and parking lots and the sidewalks are wide and sparsely populated, you might get along just fine with a wheel that is always facing forward. We found that in rural West Virginia, the swivel wheel was a luxury but certainly not a necessity.
Handle Height: If you are an average-sized man, this is probably not going to be an issue for you. But if, say, you and your (shorter) wife will both be using this stroller for running, you'll want to look for one with an adjustable handle. Few situations are more frustrating than trying to do a decent run with a stroller handle that doesn't fit. Your arm swing is already restricted by pushing the stroller; if you have to hold your hands unusually high as well, you'll be much more tempted to hire a babysitter next time. Many companies offer a stroller with an adjustable height handle and while some accomplish this better than others, all were acceptable to our testers.
Wheel Width: The main reasons to consider wheel width are spacial and aesthetic. Some might feel self conscious pushing around a stroller that takes up more than half the sidewalk. Some of us just don't have space to store such a device when it is not in use. But the wider wheeled strollers tend to offer more space for carrying along supplies or errand material, provide a better fit for larger children and feel more stable than the strollers with more narrowly spaced wheels. The more narrow vehicles feel sleek and slim, and fit through doors more easily.
Hand Brake: When we saw our first strollers, we thought the hand brake was a cute accessory, one of those things they add on so they can have more bullet points in the features box. As soon as we started running with them, though, we realized they are truly a wonderful addition to a jogging stroller, particularly for those of us who live in hilly areas. The hand brake allows the runner to maintain form and pace when running downhill with the stroller, rather than having to sit back and act as the brake to keep from losing control of the stroller. This may not be a big deal on small or shallow hills, but with long steep hills, lacking a hand brake could create a significant break from your normal (and healthy) running form.
Folding: There are two main bullet points to consider for folding: How Small and How Easy. How Small applies to you if you have a small car or storage space. In that case, you'll probably want a stroller that folds twice as these tend to have the smallest profile when folded. How Easy, though, applies to any parent. If the stroller takes 4 hands to break down or set up, then you can bet it will be staying put together 100% of the time. Most strollers take at least two hands to break down, but some can be easily snapped fully into place with one hand. This is invaluable when your other hand is occupied with carrying or comforting a testy child, or holding on to any number of other things.

The Strollers
The biggest change since the last time we reviewed jogging strollers (in 2002) is the swivel-option front wheel. In the past, jogging strollers were for just that: jogging (or running, as we Americans tend to call it). So a family generally had to own a "regular" stroller and one used for running. Most major brands of jogging strollers now provide parents an option to get 2-in-1 with a front wheel that can be locked into place for running or turned loose and allowed to swivel, making the stroller much nicer to use for walking. The result is that while your stroller garage now requires only one parking place, the stroller has gotten more complicated as companies try to satisfy the needs of users in more situations. It is conceivable that parents who don't run at all would purchase one of these strollers since the big wheels and comfortable handles tend to make them much easier to push than the ones with the small plastic wheels.

The other big change since our last review is that the wheels, as a general rule, have gotten much smaller. The largest wheels in 2002 were 24 inches and many measured in around 20". In 2009, however, the largest wheel size, 16" was shared by several of the strollers and many were smaller.
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Posted30 / 07 / 2021
How to Buy a Baby Stroller
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Whether you’re headed to the park for a leisurely stroll or to Paris to see all of the sights, a stroller is a must-have for life on the go with baby. The right stroller not only gives baby a safe place to sit or snooze, but it also provides a place for you to stash all of those must-have essentials, from wipes and diapers to a change of clothes and an extra pacifier. [/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]But finding the best stroller isn’t easy. The market is saturated with all different types of models and prices that vary widely from as little as $30 to upwards of thousands of dollars. So when you begin your hunt, first consider your budget. Then, think about how you plan to use your stroller to narrow down your options. Ask yourself some key questions, like: Where are you going to use it? Where are you going to store it? How many babies will be using it? And how much stuff do they have?[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A basic lightweight umbrella stroller makes travel (and storage) easy, while high-function stroller systems boast helpful features like extra storage and snap-on bassinets or car seats. For some, a basic model for occasional use is perfectly suitable. For others, the splurge on a more advanced model is well worth it — even if it feels like a big investment. If you frequently take baby out and about or plan to have multiple kids, your stroller will likely get miles and years of use.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Before you purchase, don’t be afraid to try out your top choices. A trial run goes a long way in making sure it works for baby’s needs — and for the needs of other family members who will be pushing it, folding it and stowing their things within it along the way.[/font]
What are the different types of strollers?
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]There are six basic types of strollers:[/font]
  • Full-sized stroller

  • Lightweight or umbrella stroller

  • Jogging stroller

  • Double stroller

  • Car seat carrier

  • Travel system 
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]It’s worth noting that although many strollers do fit squarely into the above categories, there are plenty that don’t. Some strollers can have characteristics of more than one type (i.e. a double jogging stroller).[/font]
Full-sized stroller
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: If you’re hoping to invest in one stroller that’ll wheel your baby right through the toddler years, look no further than a full-size stroller. Bigger, sturdier and usually more durable, these strollers are the standard option. Plus, many models come with a full range of features that not only make baby’s ride a joy, but also make your life easier.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Full-size stroller benefits: The go-to option for many families, a full-sized stroller covers all the basics and offers nifty bells and whistles that usually include:[/font]
  • Wide, comfortable, well-padded seat

  • Deep seat recline

  • Option to mount the seat forward-facing or rear-facing

  • Option to attach a car seat

  • Convertible design that grows with baby, from newborn use with car seat (or optional bassinet, in some cases) to toddler use

  • Expandable canopies

  • Sturdy tires with decent suspension to absorb shock

  • Roomy basket for storage

  • Telescoping handlebars (especially helpful when one parent is tall and the other is petite)

  • Useful nice-to-haves, like a cup holder or snack tray 
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Full-size stroller downsides:[/font]
  • Can be bulky and heavy (if you take public transportation, climb stairways frequently, or navigate busy streets or small stores with your baby, this can make it tougher to travel with)

  • May also be a tight fit for a small-space home with limited storage.
Lightweight or umbrella stroller
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: You might lose a few of the features you can find in a full-sized stroller, but an umbrella stroller scores points for being supremely easy to handle while on the go.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Lightweight or umbrella stroller benefits:[/font]
  • Often weighing under 15 pounds, a lightweight stroller is designed for portability (some even come with a shoulder strap).

  • These models are easy to fold, which makes stashing one in the trunk or taking it on an airplane, bus or train a snap.

  • Many lightweight strollers still come equipped with beneficial features, such as a partial seat recline, expandable canopy, storage basket and built-in cupholder or snack tray.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Lightweight stroller downsides:[/font]
  • If you’re looking for a stroller you can use from the newborn months on, a lightweight stroller won’t do. While a few models can safely carry newborns with car seat adapters or bassinet attachments, most umbrella strollers are designed for babies 6 months or older.

  • Most lightweight Pushchairs do not have a convertible option, which means if you end up having a second (or third) baby within a few years of your first, you'll likely need to purchase a second stroller.
Jogging stroller
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: On the run — literally? Then a jogging stroller might be a good option. Jogging strollers typically have larger, sturdier wheels and better suspension to take bumps and alternate terrain in stride.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Jogging stroller benefits:[/font]
  • Superior suspension lets you walk, jog or hike and keep baby in comfort while on and off the trail.

  • Many jogging strollers come with a front wheel that can swivel (for flexibility) or be fixed (for stability at higher speeds).

  • Depending on the model, other benefits may include compatibility with a car seat (for use from newborn through toddler stages), deep reclining seats, telescoping handlebars and generous storage baskets. A hand brake, five-point harness and wrist strap are key safety features, so don’t go jogging with a stroller that doesn’t include these.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Jogging stroller downsides:[/font]
  • A jogging stroller can be a bit heavier and challenging to assemble.

  • If space is tight, a jogging stroller usually can't fold up as small as an umbrella stroller.

  • Jogging strollers are typically wider than even many full-size strollers, which means maneuvering them through tight spaces can be challenging.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Keep in mind that while most three-wheeled strollers are referred to as “joggers,” not all three-wheelers are actually optimized for runners. Some of the most popular three-wheelers are “hybrid” strollers that lack hand brakes and other safety features, and therefore, aren’t intended to be used for jogging with baby. Serious runners will want to do a test drive to make sure their jogging stroller has the appropriate safety features and functionality.[/font]
Double stroller
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: If you’ve got twins in tow — or a toddler who’s not ready to give up their stroller days — then a double stroller is the way to go. Doubles come in two formats: tandem, where one child sits behind the other, or side-by-side seating.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Double stroller benefits:[/font]
  • With multiple children, this option enables you to swiftly manage only one stroller.

  • Because these models are on the bigger side, there's usually ample storage space.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Double stroller downsides:[/font]
  • Strollers for two tend to be bigger and bulkier, weighing in at up to 40 pounds and with a much larger footprint.

  • Though there are some lighter options, these are not without issues, as they don’t tend to take bumps and alternate terrain well. As you shop, consider width (does it fit through your door?), mobility (is it well balanced? how does it turn?) and whether it’s compatible with one or two car seats.
Car seat carrier
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: These wheeled frames are built to transform your infant car seat into a stroller in just a snap (literally!).[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Car seat carrier benefits:[/font]
  • Car seat carriers are compact and lightweight.

  • For a no-fuss transition into and out of the car, they are convenient and great for travel.

  • Some car seat carriers can even accommodate multiple babies.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Car seat carrier downsides:[/font]
  • Car seat carriers tend to be best for short-term use, since baby outgrows the infant car seat quickly. That said, some full-featured baby prams function as a car seat frame, then transform into a toddler-friendly stroller.

  • Car seat carriers generally do not have any extra features like cup holders or storage.
Travel system
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What it is: An easy-to-connect travel system pairs together an infant car seat and stroller. There are full-size, lightweight and jogging stroller travel systems, so you can choose a system with the type of stroller you like best.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Travel system benefits:[/font]
  • Having an infant car seat that connects to your stroller with an adapter (usually built in) means you can move your sleeping baby from the car to the stroller without waking her up.

  • Being able to buy both components as a set may save you money.
[font="Open Sans", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Travel system downsides:[/font]
  • While the stroller will usually last into the older toddler years, your baby will outgrow the infant car seat much sooner than that.

  • If you’re a multiple-car family, you’ll need to buy a separate car seat or base to use with your second car.
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Posted30 / 07 / 2021
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